My Blog

Uncategorized

Long Live the Short Chains

The Montessori Short Chains and Arrows pack a big learning punch and are often under-utilized.IMG_4716 They're great for a homeschool environment because they don't take up any shelf space. Their initial purpose is to help the child first count linearly and then skip-count. But when your child is comfortable with these two concepts, you can use the chains for much more! Here are four ideas...

IMG_4657Find the number: Ask the child to set out the hundred chain with the corresponding arrows, while you cut up a...

Read more…

BOTW: The Story of Money

Is your child afraid of math? I know many who are. I also know that one of the most effective ways to help them overcome their fear of math is to give them an allowance. In addition to teaching your child patience, opportunity cost, and the value of things, money is a hands-on way to work through many math skills!

My son got hooked on math through his allowance. At the age of four, he wanted to save up for a LEGO kit. On a piece of graph paper, I marked one square for each dollar he would have...

Read more…

The Valentine's Day Story

Zachary, age 7, asked me how Valentine's Day started. I told him we could research that at the library, but later that night I got curious and went online. I found conflicting information, so I decided to put together a Cosmic Education story to tell him the tale of the origins of Valentine's day. I shared it with him and it inspired us to make care packages for the people experiencing homelessness in our area. I hope it can inspire acts of kindness, or at least get some conversations...

Read more…

One Day

For more than 12 months, Zachary threw stuff when he was tired, or angry, or couldn't find the words to communicate how he felt or what he wanted. Toys, food, china and silverware; it all flew across the house. And then one day, it stopped. Limits helped. Consistency helped. But what was the magic bullet? Time.

I practiced elimination communication with Zachary. By the time he was one, he was diaper-free all day. By two, he was diaper-free at night. Then, when he was 3 1/2, his sister was born...

Read more…

Wait and Connect

You know when your child does something -like throw his toys on the floor - to show his frustration over a perceived injustice, and you tell him to clean it up, and he refuses, and you insist, and he digs in his heels, andyour ego is insulted and says "How dare he?!",so you resort to punishment because you feel powerless, and then he gets angry at you because "You're so mean!" and sees himself as the victim, and you lose the opportunity to teach a lesson aboutdealing with frustration?

It would...

Read more…

Share Your Floor Bed Story!

If you have a floor bed success story and would like to share it with other parents and Montessori enthusiasts, please send a brief (3-4 paragraph) description of your experience to thefullmontessori @ gmail . com

Thank you for your help (and thanks again to those of you who've already shared their floor bed journey)!

Read more…

Cursive Cards

For the past few weeks, Zach has shown a strong interest in sounds and letters. He's constantly pointing out letters and asking what sound they make, and then thinking of words that start with that sound. However, he's not keen on tracing the sandpaper letters. I can't say I blame him; ours arepretty rough (because they're new) and hisindex and middle fingers are verysensitive because he sucks them!

It irritates me that he doesn't see cursive letters anywhere except in school (most signs that...

Read more…

Turning Picky Into Practical

Toddlers are famous for their food fixations. I'm blessed to be raising a very adventurous eater, but even Zachhas some toddler quirks that would drive me insane if I chose to let them bother me.

This morning, I pulled out a container with a few strawberries from the fridge. I asked Zach if he'd like some with his breakfast and he said yes. I told him I had to rinse them first, and he flipped out. While he screamed, I washed the strawberries, put them in a bowl, and took them to the table.

...

Read more…

Pom-Poms vs. Broccoli

Practical Life activities shouldbe, above all else, practical: real activities that have a purpose and a goal. Practical Life IMG_0309should never, EVER be busy work. Busy work is insulting to the child's intelligence and developmental drives.

So, let's say you want to introduce transferring with tongs. Instead of the ubiquitous pom-poms you see all over Pinterest, how about using broccoli?

Here's what I did with Zach (who just turned 3), when he asked if he could help in the kitchen:

I had already...

Read more…

To Follow the Child

Now that Zachary is three years old,I'm constantly surprised by how differently Montessori happens at home and in school.

In a classroom, you plan your lessons in part around the child's interests and abilities, but also based on the sequence in your album. The children are (for the most part) happy and willing to receive the presentations. Not so at home when it's your own child. I've learned that nine times out of ten, we'll only do anything productive if Zachary initiates it. If I invite...

Read more…

Categories